SHATTERED DREAMS

After our Mango Habenero Saison turned out so well, we’ve been set on brewing more beer with hot peppers. Chad had been set on doing a smoked chipotle porter, but then I had a much better idea: a hot pepper milk stout. I think that the sweetness would help balance the heat, much like the mango tempered the habenero.

But that’s not the real reason I wanted to brew this. The truth is much… Stupider. You see, typically a milk stout is brewed with lactose, an unfermentable sugar, to add a bit of sweetness. You know what else has lactose? Breastmilk. You know whose refrigerator is full of breastmilk? Chad and Olivia’s. I bet no one’s brewed a beer with THAT ingredient! But that’s not even the best part! If we add chili peppers in the secondary, we could call it the Red Hot Chili Peppers Mother’s Milk stout! Get it? Like the album? But nooooooo, Chad and Olivia thought it was gross and weird and didn’t even value my dedication to pun-based recipes. Well, I guesd they’ll be sorry after I brew the General Ripper’s Precious Bodily Fluids Cream Ale (made with non-fluoridated water, of course).
AIN’T NO SMOGGY SMOG ON ROCKY TOP…
…but apparently there is plenty of rain.  We decided to work on our smoked beers during the two rainiest days so far this summer.  The success of last year’s Rocky Top Rauch (and complete failure of the Vols) inspired us to make a second attempt at a rauchbier, plus a smoked breakfast porter.  After consulting SEC rival forcera on smoking your own malt, we decided to put our smoker to (less than ideal) use.  We didn’t have time to construct screens for the malt to rest on, so I bought some cake pans and went Breaking Bad on them with a prison shank.  We split six pounds of 2-row in these perforated pans and smoked them with cherry wood for about five hours, misting and turning the grains whenever the intermittent monsoon would let us.  Though two days of biblical flooding may be an ominous portent for another Vols losing season, Chad remains optimistic and predicts an 8-4 record.  Cuz we know how well that prediction turned out last year.
Recipe:
12oz Carapils
1# Dingeman’s Smoked Malt
1# Crystal 120 L
2# Vienna
5# Munich
6# Cherry-smoked 2-row
6.25# 2-row
Mash at 153 for 60 min
The Rocky Top Rauch was a pretty simple boil, with a single bittering charge of 1oz Perle at 50min and .5oz Tettnang at flame-out.  We pitched a starter of WLP060 American Ale Blend.
The Smoked Breakfast Porter was a little more complicated:
1oz Willamette first-wort hops
4oz each Roasted Barley, Black Patent Malt, Chocolate Malt steep for 30min
.5oz Tettnang boil 60 min
1oz Goldings boil 20 min
8.5 oz Grade B Maple Syrup boil 5 min
This one got WLP013 London Ale Yeast, which supposedly has smokey, oakey esters.  After primary fermentation, we’ll rack it to a carboy and add coarse-ground coffee and more maple syrup.  With the addition of these beers, we have a pretty full laundry room… er, fermentation chamber.  The dry-hopped IPA and Pale Ale will be ready to bottle in a few days, while the pineapple saison is still sitting in the secondary with the brett and pineapple.  In a few days we’ll add a bag of frozen pineapple, some sugar and yeast nutrient, and maybe some dregs from a bottle of Orval.  We’ll let it sit and funkify at least another month, then dry hop it and bottle in some Belgian bottles.
Go Vols!  Don’t let us down… again. AIN’T NO SMOGGY SMOG ON ROCKY TOP…
…but apparently there is plenty of rain.  We decided to work on our smoked beers during the two rainiest days so far this summer.  The success of last year’s Rocky Top Rauch (and complete failure of the Vols) inspired us to make a second attempt at a rauchbier, plus a smoked breakfast porter.  After consulting SEC rival forcera on smoking your own malt, we decided to put our smoker to (less than ideal) use.  We didn’t have time to construct screens for the malt to rest on, so I bought some cake pans and went Breaking Bad on them with a prison shank.  We split six pounds of 2-row in these perforated pans and smoked them with cherry wood for about five hours, misting and turning the grains whenever the intermittent monsoon would let us.  Though two days of biblical flooding may be an ominous portent for another Vols losing season, Chad remains optimistic and predicts an 8-4 record.  Cuz we know how well that prediction turned out last year.
Recipe:
12oz Carapils
1# Dingeman’s Smoked Malt
1# Crystal 120 L
2# Vienna
5# Munich
6# Cherry-smoked 2-row
6.25# 2-row
Mash at 153 for 60 min
The Rocky Top Rauch was a pretty simple boil, with a single bittering charge of 1oz Perle at 50min and .5oz Tettnang at flame-out.  We pitched a starter of WLP060 American Ale Blend.
The Smoked Breakfast Porter was a little more complicated:
1oz Willamette first-wort hops
4oz each Roasted Barley, Black Patent Malt, Chocolate Malt steep for 30min
.5oz Tettnang boil 60 min
1oz Goldings boil 20 min
8.5 oz Grade B Maple Syrup boil 5 min
This one got WLP013 London Ale Yeast, which supposedly has smokey, oakey esters.  After primary fermentation, we’ll rack it to a carboy and add coarse-ground coffee and more maple syrup.  With the addition of these beers, we have a pretty full laundry room… er, fermentation chamber.  The dry-hopped IPA and Pale Ale will be ready to bottle in a few days, while the pineapple saison is still sitting in the secondary with the brett and pineapple.  In a few days we’ll add a bag of frozen pineapple, some sugar and yeast nutrient, and maybe some dregs from a bottle of Orval.  We’ll let it sit and funkify at least another month, then dry hop it and bottle in some Belgian bottles.
Go Vols!  Don’t let us down… again. AIN’T NO SMOGGY SMOG ON ROCKY TOP…
…but apparently there is plenty of rain.  We decided to work on our smoked beers during the two rainiest days so far this summer.  The success of last year’s Rocky Top Rauch (and complete failure of the Vols) inspired us to make a second attempt at a rauchbier, plus a smoked breakfast porter.  After consulting SEC rival forcera on smoking your own malt, we decided to put our smoker to (less than ideal) use.  We didn’t have time to construct screens for the malt to rest on, so I bought some cake pans and went Breaking Bad on them with a prison shank.  We split six pounds of 2-row in these perforated pans and smoked them with cherry wood for about five hours, misting and turning the grains whenever the intermittent monsoon would let us.  Though two days of biblical flooding may be an ominous portent for another Vols losing season, Chad remains optimistic and predicts an 8-4 record.  Cuz we know how well that prediction turned out last year.
Recipe:
12oz Carapils
1# Dingeman’s Smoked Malt
1# Crystal 120 L
2# Vienna
5# Munich
6# Cherry-smoked 2-row
6.25# 2-row
Mash at 153 for 60 min
The Rocky Top Rauch was a pretty simple boil, with a single bittering charge of 1oz Perle at 50min and .5oz Tettnang at flame-out.  We pitched a starter of WLP060 American Ale Blend.
The Smoked Breakfast Porter was a little more complicated:
1oz Willamette first-wort hops
4oz each Roasted Barley, Black Patent Malt, Chocolate Malt steep for 30min
.5oz Tettnang boil 60 min
1oz Goldings boil 20 min
8.5 oz Grade B Maple Syrup boil 5 min
This one got WLP013 London Ale Yeast, which supposedly has smokey, oakey esters.  After primary fermentation, we’ll rack it to a carboy and add coarse-ground coffee and more maple syrup.  With the addition of these beers, we have a pretty full laundry room… er, fermentation chamber.  The dry-hopped IPA and Pale Ale will be ready to bottle in a few days, while the pineapple saison is still sitting in the secondary with the brett and pineapple.  In a few days we’ll add a bag of frozen pineapple, some sugar and yeast nutrient, and maybe some dregs from a bottle of Orval.  We’ll let it sit and funkify at least another month, then dry hop it and bottle in some Belgian bottles.
Go Vols!  Don’t let us down… again. AIN’T NO SMOGGY SMOG ON ROCKY TOP…
…but apparently there is plenty of rain.  We decided to work on our smoked beers during the two rainiest days so far this summer.  The success of last year’s Rocky Top Rauch (and complete failure of the Vols) inspired us to make a second attempt at a rauchbier, plus a smoked breakfast porter.  After consulting SEC rival forcera on smoking your own malt, we decided to put our smoker to (less than ideal) use.  We didn’t have time to construct screens for the malt to rest on, so I bought some cake pans and went Breaking Bad on them with a prison shank.  We split six pounds of 2-row in these perforated pans and smoked them with cherry wood for about five hours, misting and turning the grains whenever the intermittent monsoon would let us.  Though two days of biblical flooding may be an ominous portent for another Vols losing season, Chad remains optimistic and predicts an 8-4 record.  Cuz we know how well that prediction turned out last year.
Recipe:
12oz Carapils
1# Dingeman’s Smoked Malt
1# Crystal 120 L
2# Vienna
5# Munich
6# Cherry-smoked 2-row
6.25# 2-row
Mash at 153 for 60 min
The Rocky Top Rauch was a pretty simple boil, with a single bittering charge of 1oz Perle at 50min and .5oz Tettnang at flame-out.  We pitched a starter of WLP060 American Ale Blend.
The Smoked Breakfast Porter was a little more complicated:
1oz Willamette first-wort hops
4oz each Roasted Barley, Black Patent Malt, Chocolate Malt steep for 30min
.5oz Tettnang boil 60 min
1oz Goldings boil 20 min
8.5 oz Grade B Maple Syrup boil 5 min
This one got WLP013 London Ale Yeast, which supposedly has smokey, oakey esters.  After primary fermentation, we’ll rack it to a carboy and add coarse-ground coffee and more maple syrup.  With the addition of these beers, we have a pretty full laundry room… er, fermentation chamber.  The dry-hopped IPA and Pale Ale will be ready to bottle in a few days, while the pineapple saison is still sitting in the secondary with the brett and pineapple.  In a few days we’ll add a bag of frozen pineapple, some sugar and yeast nutrient, and maybe some dregs from a bottle of Orval.  We’ll let it sit and funkify at least another month, then dry hop it and bottle in some Belgian bottles.
Go Vols!  Don’t let us down… again.

AIN’T NO SMOGGY SMOG ON ROCKY TOP…

…but apparently there is plenty of rain.  We decided to work on our smoked beers during the two rainiest days so far this summer.  The success of last year’s Rocky Top Rauch (and complete failure of the Vols) inspired us to make a second attempt at a rauchbier, plus a smoked breakfast porter.  After consulting SEC rival forcera on smoking your own malt, we decided to put our smoker to (less than ideal) use.  We didn’t have time to construct screens for the malt to rest on, so I bought some cake pans and went Breaking Bad on them with a prison shank.  We split six pounds of 2-row in these perforated pans and smoked them with cherry wood for about five hours, misting and turning the grains whenever the intermittent monsoon would let us.  Though two days of biblical flooding may be an ominous portent for another Vols losing season, Chad remains optimistic and predicts an 8-4 record.  Cuz we know how well that prediction turned out last year.

Recipe:

  • 12oz Carapils
  • 1# Dingeman’s Smoked Malt
  • 1# Crystal 120 L
  • 2# Vienna
  • 5# Munich
  • 6# Cherry-smoked 2-row
  • 6.25# 2-row
  • Mash at 153 for 60 min

The Rocky Top Rauch was a pretty simple boil, with a single bittering charge of 1oz Perle at 50min and .5oz Tettnang at flame-out.  We pitched a starter of WLP060 American Ale Blend.

The Smoked Breakfast Porter was a little more complicated:

  • 1oz Willamette first-wort hops
  • 4oz each Roasted Barley, Black Patent Malt, Chocolate Malt steep for 30min
  • .5oz Tettnang boil 60 min
  • 1oz Goldings boil 20 min
  • 8.5 oz Grade B Maple Syrup boil 5 min

This one got WLP013 London Ale Yeast, which supposedly has smokey, oakey esters.  After primary fermentation, we’ll rack it to a carboy and add coarse-ground coffee and more maple syrup.  With the addition of these beers, we have a pretty full laundry room… er, fermentation chamber.  The dry-hopped IPA and Pale Ale will be ready to bottle in a few days, while the pineapple saison is still sitting in the secondary with the brett and pineapple.  In a few days we’ll add a bag of frozen pineapple, some sugar and yeast nutrient, and maybe some dregs from a bottle of Orval.  We’ll let it sit and funkify at least another month, then dry hop it and bottle in some Belgian bottles.

Go Vols!  Don’t let us down… again.

Q

funkychickenbrewing asked:

Can you give any advice on smoking your own malt? We're looking at doing another Rocky Top Rauch (Go Vols!) plus a smoked breakfast porter.

A

forcera:

You mean like smoke them like this???

To be fair he could smoke just about anyone in a race.

Anyway on to smoking malt. 

When smoking malt I found three things to be important. First is the temperature in the smoker. Second is having a low moisture level in the malt while smoking the malt. Third is the type of wood that you use. I’ll go over my process and then address the three key issues. I’ll also go over a few other things and throw in my recipe. I found that the recipe is the easy part. Smoked beers are really made in the smoker. 

When I smoke my malt I set my smoker up for a cold smoke, see the following picture. I use my small Webber grill as the fire box and run some ducking into the smoker to transfer the smoke. I’ll talk more about cold smoking when I go over the temperature. 

image

(Yes, I know there is match lite charcoal in this picture. Normally I would never use it however it was on sale and a bonus fuel points item when I bought it, $.15 per gallon if I remember correctly. Normally I use natural lump and start the fire with a chimney)

To hold the malt I form a pan out of screen that will fit in the main body of my smoker. I use screen similar to a metal screen that you would find on a window. My smoker will hold around six pounds of malt at a time. 

image

With this setup I typically smoke my malt for around four hours. During this time I rotate malt every 30-45 minutes, whenever I would check on the fire. I just mix the malt around so that the malt gets equal exposure the smoke. I like the intensity and complexity of the smoke that I get from this length of time.

After running several batches through the smoker I found that the temperature is the most important thing to watch. I keep the temperature under 120 F, closer to 100 F if possible. This is why I set my smoker up for a cold smoke. I also try to pick a weekend where it’s going to be cooler to help keep the temperature down. I found the if the temperature goes above 120 F I would get some unpleasant flavors and aromas. The flavors and aromas were similar to ash and burnt wood. 

While smoking the malt you do need a low level of moisture in the malt. This helps the smoke adhere to the malt. You do not want the malt to be wet just slightly damp. To accomplish this I use a spray bottle filled with water on a fine mist setting. During the first two hours I mist the malt every 30-45 minutes, I do this after rotating the malt. I stop misting the malt with about two hours left in the smoking process. You need to stop this so that the malt has time to dry out before being pulled out of the smoker. 

The wood that you use in the smoker is really a personal preference however I feel very strongly about using fruit woods. Apple is my house wood that I use for almost everything. I like the subtly sweet flavor and aroma that come from using fruit woods. I suggest against using woods like hickory because of their association with bacon. Yes the style guidelines say that the aroma can be “bacon-like” however I don’t want that aroma in my beer. I want the aroma to be more BBQ than bacon. In the batches were I used hickory wood the flavor reminded everyone of bacon but not BBQ. Sure when using fruit woods people still say bacon, but people also say BBQ. 

Those are the three big things to watch out for. One other thing to make sure you do is to let the malt thoroughly cool before storing in a closed container. A paper grocery bag works fine. I sealed the malt up once and the heat formed condensation. When I went to grind the malt it just turned to mush. We wound up drying the malt in the oven and it produced a WONDERFUL beer, but I would rather not go through that again. Also some people say that you need to give the malt a week or so to rest after smoking but I have found this to not be true. I like to use the malt on the following day if at all possible. I have never tried smoking and brewing on the same day so I cannot comment on that. Normally when I have my cold smoker already setup I’m smoking several things to my attention is diverted to that. I found that when the smoked malt is used quickly it is much more intense and the complexity is greater. After waiting a week I would never get the same level of smoke, for the same weight of smoked malt, and the aroma and flavor were very one note. 

when I brew I make a 6 gallon batch and transfer 5.5 gallons to my fermentor. I also have an efficiency of around 65%

My recipe is

5.25# Two Row (39.3%)

5.25# Smoked Two Row (39.3%)

1.5# Dark Munich (11.2%)

.75# Cara Munich (5.6%)

.25# Carafoam (1.9%) I add it to everything for head retention

.25# Melanoidin (1.9%)

.125# Black Patent (.8%)

Mash at 152 F for 60 minutes

Boil for 60 minutes

enough clean bittering hop at 60 minutes to get around 30 IBUs

1 oz Tettnanger at 10 minutes

I make the beer as a lager and I use WLP833 German Bock Lager for all of my lagers. If you can’t do lager you can use WLP060 American Ale Yeast Blend. While the lager yeast works best the ale version works. WLP060 is super clean, I think it’s cleaner than WLP001. 

I hope that helps. Also remember to taste the malt during the smoking process. That will let you know when it’s reached the level of smoke that you want. If you have any other questions I’m more than willing to help out. 

Time to try this!

brewshack said: Love the sound of the tea pale, it’s something I really want to try myself, is it something you’ve done before? Do you think flame out is the best place for addition, will you add any additional tea liquor during secondary?

We’ve never done a brew with green tea before, so hopefully this will turn out great!  I think flame-out best mimics the tea-steeping process, as well as preserves the flavors more than say first-wort teabagging would.  We are going to add about two or three teabags worth of liquor as a pseudo dry hop.

brasseur said: Is that warm must flowing into your boiler? Beware of hotside aeration, it will seriously oxydize your beer.

When we first got this set-up I had some high temp tubing running from the MLT to the kettle, but I got rid of it because we kept getting air in the hose which led to some bubbling/ slow runoff times.  I suppose a hose clamp would eliminate that problem, but I’ve never noticed any stale cardboard tastes coming from any of the beers we’ve done, even after months of storage.  However, I am looking to put a dip-tube in the tun, which will require the tubing and hose-clamp to maintain a siphon.  So, thus far, we’ve managed to keep the spectre of hot side aeration at bay.

lifeasamusical said: That’s a shit load of bittering hops!

I’d say our last couple DIPAs had been strongly influenced by Vinnie Cilurzo’s article and recipe for Pliny the Elder (check out the huge bittering addition there!)  The blink-182 DIPA had an 2.5oz of 60 min hops plus 2.5oz of first wort hops, while the Hop Hysteria had an ounce at 60 plus FIVE oz of first wort hops.  I liked the bitterness that came through on the blink-182 better than the Hop Hysteria, which was mostly just flavor and aroma.  For this formulation, I got rid of first wort hops and put everything in as late addition or whirlpool, but added more to the 60min addition to keep the IBUs up high.  I also used Vinnie’s original idea for Pliny the Younger by making a less alcoholic beer but with DIPA level hops.

BLITZKRIEG HOP
Once again, our unhealthy obsession with brewing the perfect IPA has reared its hoppy head, much to Brandon’s lupulin-phobic chagrin. We paired this unholy hop monster with an easy-drinking green-tea pale ale.
Total Grain Bill
12oz Carapils
1lb Crystal 60L
1lb Victory
2lb Munich
5lb Maris Otter
11.25lb 2-Row
Mash at 151 for 75min
IPA
3oz Magnum boil 60 min
.75oz Simcoe boil 15 min
.75oz Galaxy boil 10 min
12oz Cornsugar boil 10 min
1tsp Irish moss boil 10 min
1oz Chinook boil 5 min
1.5oz Amarillo, 1oz Chinook, .75oz Simcoe, .75oz Galaxy whirlpool 30 min
West Yorkshire Ale Yeast Wyeast 1469
Dry hop for 7 days with 1oz Chinook, .5 oz Galaxy, .5 oz Amarillo, .5 oz Simcoe.
This IPA is different from our past attempts in a few ways— it is relatively weaker in terms of abv (about 6.5%), plus we used West Yorkshire instead of our usual Chico strain to bring out the malt a little bit more and add pleasant stone-fruit esters.  We’ve ditched the first-wort hopping from previous IPAs because I think it made the hops too smooth (like me) and more muddled (also like me) than I would like.  The big bittering charge will be an aggressive counter-balance to the huge malt bill, while the all-late addition hops really smack you over the head with a deadly combo of fruity, dank, citrus, pine flavor and aroma.  A 2oz dry-hop should be much more efficient than our last fool-hardy 5oz dry hopping, especially since nowhere in the process have we used a hop-bag (as evidenced by the super-sticky kettle pic above).  I’m also glad to welcome Amarillo and Galaxy to the club, while kicking poor old Cascade, Centennial, and Nugget to the curb.  Sorry, guys.
Green Tea Pale Ale
1 oz Citra boil 20 min
1lb Dry Malt Extract boil 15 min
1 tsp irish moss boil 10 min
1oz Citra boil 10 min
24 bags lipton green tea flameout
1 tbsp orange peel, 1 tbsp lemon peel flameout
US-05 yeast
These two have been fermenting away, filling Chad’s house with some dankly delicious hop aromas.  Now all we have to do is come up with some terrible pun-based names for these beers. BLITZKRIEG HOP
Once again, our unhealthy obsession with brewing the perfect IPA has reared its hoppy head, much to Brandon’s lupulin-phobic chagrin. We paired this unholy hop monster with an easy-drinking green-tea pale ale.
Total Grain Bill
12oz Carapils
1lb Crystal 60L
1lb Victory
2lb Munich
5lb Maris Otter
11.25lb 2-Row
Mash at 151 for 75min
IPA
3oz Magnum boil 60 min
.75oz Simcoe boil 15 min
.75oz Galaxy boil 10 min
12oz Cornsugar boil 10 min
1tsp Irish moss boil 10 min
1oz Chinook boil 5 min
1.5oz Amarillo, 1oz Chinook, .75oz Simcoe, .75oz Galaxy whirlpool 30 min
West Yorkshire Ale Yeast Wyeast 1469
Dry hop for 7 days with 1oz Chinook, .5 oz Galaxy, .5 oz Amarillo, .5 oz Simcoe.
This IPA is different from our past attempts in a few ways— it is relatively weaker in terms of abv (about 6.5%), plus we used West Yorkshire instead of our usual Chico strain to bring out the malt a little bit more and add pleasant stone-fruit esters.  We’ve ditched the first-wort hopping from previous IPAs because I think it made the hops too smooth (like me) and more muddled (also like me) than I would like.  The big bittering charge will be an aggressive counter-balance to the huge malt bill, while the all-late addition hops really smack you over the head with a deadly combo of fruity, dank, citrus, pine flavor and aroma.  A 2oz dry-hop should be much more efficient than our last fool-hardy 5oz dry hopping, especially since nowhere in the process have we used a hop-bag (as evidenced by the super-sticky kettle pic above).  I’m also glad to welcome Amarillo and Galaxy to the club, while kicking poor old Cascade, Centennial, and Nugget to the curb.  Sorry, guys.
Green Tea Pale Ale
1 oz Citra boil 20 min
1lb Dry Malt Extract boil 15 min
1 tsp irish moss boil 10 min
1oz Citra boil 10 min
24 bags lipton green tea flameout
1 tbsp orange peel, 1 tbsp lemon peel flameout
US-05 yeast
These two have been fermenting away, filling Chad’s house with some dankly delicious hop aromas.  Now all we have to do is come up with some terrible pun-based names for these beers. BLITZKRIEG HOP
Once again, our unhealthy obsession with brewing the perfect IPA has reared its hoppy head, much to Brandon’s lupulin-phobic chagrin. We paired this unholy hop monster with an easy-drinking green-tea pale ale.
Total Grain Bill
12oz Carapils
1lb Crystal 60L
1lb Victory
2lb Munich
5lb Maris Otter
11.25lb 2-Row
Mash at 151 for 75min
IPA
3oz Magnum boil 60 min
.75oz Simcoe boil 15 min
.75oz Galaxy boil 10 min
12oz Cornsugar boil 10 min
1tsp Irish moss boil 10 min
1oz Chinook boil 5 min
1.5oz Amarillo, 1oz Chinook, .75oz Simcoe, .75oz Galaxy whirlpool 30 min
West Yorkshire Ale Yeast Wyeast 1469
Dry hop for 7 days with 1oz Chinook, .5 oz Galaxy, .5 oz Amarillo, .5 oz Simcoe.
This IPA is different from our past attempts in a few ways— it is relatively weaker in terms of abv (about 6.5%), plus we used West Yorkshire instead of our usual Chico strain to bring out the malt a little bit more and add pleasant stone-fruit esters.  We’ve ditched the first-wort hopping from previous IPAs because I think it made the hops too smooth (like me) and more muddled (also like me) than I would like.  The big bittering charge will be an aggressive counter-balance to the huge malt bill, while the all-late addition hops really smack you over the head with a deadly combo of fruity, dank, citrus, pine flavor and aroma.  A 2oz dry-hop should be much more efficient than our last fool-hardy 5oz dry hopping, especially since nowhere in the process have we used a hop-bag (as evidenced by the super-sticky kettle pic above).  I’m also glad to welcome Amarillo and Galaxy to the club, while kicking poor old Cascade, Centennial, and Nugget to the curb.  Sorry, guys.
Green Tea Pale Ale
1 oz Citra boil 20 min
1lb Dry Malt Extract boil 15 min
1 tsp irish moss boil 10 min
1oz Citra boil 10 min
24 bags lipton green tea flameout
1 tbsp orange peel, 1 tbsp lemon peel flameout
US-05 yeast
These two have been fermenting away, filling Chad’s house with some dankly delicious hop aromas.  Now all we have to do is come up with some terrible pun-based names for these beers.

BLITZKRIEG HOP

Once again, our unhealthy obsession with brewing the perfect IPA has reared its hoppy head, much to Brandon’s lupulin-phobic chagrin. We paired this unholy hop monster with an easy-drinking green-tea pale ale.

Total Grain Bill

  • 12oz Carapils
  • 1lb Crystal 60L
  • 1lb Victory
  • 2lb Munich
  • 5lb Maris Otter
  • 11.25lb 2-Row
  • Mash at 151 for 75min

IPA

  • 3oz Magnum boil 60 min
  • .75oz Simcoe boil 15 min
  • .75oz Galaxy boil 10 min
  • 12oz Cornsugar boil 10 min
  • 1tsp Irish moss boil 10 min
  • 1oz Chinook boil 5 min
  • 1.5oz Amarillo, 1oz Chinook, .75oz Simcoe, .75oz Galaxy whirlpool 30 min
  • West Yorkshire Ale Yeast Wyeast 1469
  • Dry hop for 7 days with 1oz Chinook, .5 oz Galaxy, .5 oz Amarillo, .5 oz Simcoe.

This IPA is different from our past attempts in a few ways— it is relatively weaker in terms of abv (about 6.5%), plus we used West Yorkshire instead of our usual Chico strain to bring out the malt a little bit more and add pleasant stone-fruit esters.  We’ve ditched the first-wort hopping from previous IPAs because I think it made the hops too smooth (like me) and more muddled (also like me) than I would like.  The big bittering charge will be an aggressive counter-balance to the huge malt bill, while the all-late addition hops really smack you over the head with a deadly combo of fruity, dank, citrus, pine flavor and aroma.  A 2oz dry-hop should be much more efficient than our last fool-hardy 5oz dry hopping, especially since nowhere in the process have we used a hop-bag (as evidenced by the super-sticky kettle pic above).  I’m also glad to welcome Amarillo and Galaxy to the club, while kicking poor old Cascade, Centennial, and Nugget to the curb.  Sorry, guys.

Green Tea Pale Ale

  • 1 oz Citra boil 20 min
  • 1lb Dry Malt Extract boil 15 min
  • 1 tsp irish moss boil 10 min
  • 1oz Citra boil 10 min
  • 24 bags lipton green tea flameout
  • 1 tbsp orange peel, 1 tbsp lemon peel flameout
  • US-05 yeast

These two have been fermenting away, filling Chad’s house with some dankly delicious hop aromas.  Now all we have to do is come up with some terrible pun-based names for these beers.

POST-BABY BREWING
Our initial plans to brew on Easter were thwarted by the birth of Chad the Dad’s son— and yes, as I predicted, he is as gassy as his mom and dad.  I also predicted that he’d be born on 4/20 so I think I deserve a prize or at least my own psychic hotline.  Anyways, it wasn’t until two weeks ago that we managed to align our schedules and make our double batch of fruity saisons.
Grain bill
8oz Carapils
8oz Crystal 60
5lb Munich
14lb 2-Row
Mash at 152 for 75 min
The first boil was a Mango Habanero Saison, since Brandon is always in the mood for something hot and fruity (ha ha, see what I did there?)  We added an ounce of Galaxy hops at 20, 10, and flameout, as well as the flesh of a habenero pepper.  Since I am an idiot, I thought it would be a great idea to eat the seeds and guts of the pepper, and immediately burst into a sweat and tears and my lips turned a delightful shade of bright purple.  This is only the third time I have eaten a whole habanero and I have still not learned my lesson.  Luckily, we had lots of beer on hand to sooth my burns, as well as a smoked pork shoulder to feast upon.
The second batch was our second attempt at our infamous Pineapple Pale Ale.  The initial boil was fairly straight forward and only received an ounce of Saaz at 60 min and flame-out.
We pitched a pack of Belle Saison yeast in each batch, and let them ferment for ten days.  Then we racked the beers to secondary fermenters, and added 30oz of mango chunks and another pepper to the Mango Habanero, with a forthcoming dry hop of Galaxy in a week.  The Pineapple Saison got two cored pineapples, as well as a new dose of yeast, this time Brett C, to enhance the pineappley funkiness.
It will probably be a month or more before we taste any of these beauties, so we’ll try to make our Deadpool Double Red IPA and Belgian Saffron ales last until then (highly unlikely).  Hopefully our brewing schedule will become more consistent and we can go back to having a never-ending pipeline of homebrews. POST-BABY BREWING
Our initial plans to brew on Easter were thwarted by the birth of Chad the Dad’s son— and yes, as I predicted, he is as gassy as his mom and dad.  I also predicted that he’d be born on 4/20 so I think I deserve a prize or at least my own psychic hotline.  Anyways, it wasn’t until two weeks ago that we managed to align our schedules and make our double batch of fruity saisons.
Grain bill
8oz Carapils
8oz Crystal 60
5lb Munich
14lb 2-Row
Mash at 152 for 75 min
The first boil was a Mango Habanero Saison, since Brandon is always in the mood for something hot and fruity (ha ha, see what I did there?)  We added an ounce of Galaxy hops at 20, 10, and flameout, as well as the flesh of a habenero pepper.  Since I am an idiot, I thought it would be a great idea to eat the seeds and guts of the pepper, and immediately burst into a sweat and tears and my lips turned a delightful shade of bright purple.  This is only the third time I have eaten a whole habanero and I have still not learned my lesson.  Luckily, we had lots of beer on hand to sooth my burns, as well as a smoked pork shoulder to feast upon.
The second batch was our second attempt at our infamous Pineapple Pale Ale.  The initial boil was fairly straight forward and only received an ounce of Saaz at 60 min and flame-out.
We pitched a pack of Belle Saison yeast in each batch, and let them ferment for ten days.  Then we racked the beers to secondary fermenters, and added 30oz of mango chunks and another pepper to the Mango Habanero, with a forthcoming dry hop of Galaxy in a week.  The Pineapple Saison got two cored pineapples, as well as a new dose of yeast, this time Brett C, to enhance the pineappley funkiness.
It will probably be a month or more before we taste any of these beauties, so we’ll try to make our Deadpool Double Red IPA and Belgian Saffron ales last until then (highly unlikely).  Hopefully our brewing schedule will become more consistent and we can go back to having a never-ending pipeline of homebrews. POST-BABY BREWING
Our initial plans to brew on Easter were thwarted by the birth of Chad the Dad’s son— and yes, as I predicted, he is as gassy as his mom and dad.  I also predicted that he’d be born on 4/20 so I think I deserve a prize or at least my own psychic hotline.  Anyways, it wasn’t until two weeks ago that we managed to align our schedules and make our double batch of fruity saisons.
Grain bill
8oz Carapils
8oz Crystal 60
5lb Munich
14lb 2-Row
Mash at 152 for 75 min
The first boil was a Mango Habanero Saison, since Brandon is always in the mood for something hot and fruity (ha ha, see what I did there?)  We added an ounce of Galaxy hops at 20, 10, and flameout, as well as the flesh of a habenero pepper.  Since I am an idiot, I thought it would be a great idea to eat the seeds and guts of the pepper, and immediately burst into a sweat and tears and my lips turned a delightful shade of bright purple.  This is only the third time I have eaten a whole habanero and I have still not learned my lesson.  Luckily, we had lots of beer on hand to sooth my burns, as well as a smoked pork shoulder to feast upon.
The second batch was our second attempt at our infamous Pineapple Pale Ale.  The initial boil was fairly straight forward and only received an ounce of Saaz at 60 min and flame-out.
We pitched a pack of Belle Saison yeast in each batch, and let them ferment for ten days.  Then we racked the beers to secondary fermenters, and added 30oz of mango chunks and another pepper to the Mango Habanero, with a forthcoming dry hop of Galaxy in a week.  The Pineapple Saison got two cored pineapples, as well as a new dose of yeast, this time Brett C, to enhance the pineappley funkiness.
It will probably be a month or more before we taste any of these beauties, so we’ll try to make our Deadpool Double Red IPA and Belgian Saffron ales last until then (highly unlikely).  Hopefully our brewing schedule will become more consistent and we can go back to having a never-ending pipeline of homebrews.

POST-BABY BREWING

Our initial plans to brew on Easter were thwarted by the birth of Chad the Dad’s son— and yes, as I predicted, he is as gassy as his mom and dad.  I also predicted that he’d be born on 4/20 so I think I deserve a prize or at least my own psychic hotline.  Anyways, it wasn’t until two weeks ago that we managed to align our schedules and make our double batch of fruity saisons.

  • Grain bill
  • 8oz Carapils
  • 8oz Crystal 60
  • 5lb Munich
  • 14lb 2-Row
  • Mash at 152 for 75 min

The first boil was a Mango Habanero Saison, since Brandon is always in the mood for something hot and fruity (ha ha, see what I did there?)  We added an ounce of Galaxy hops at 20, 10, and flameout, as well as the flesh of a habenero pepper.  Since I am an idiot, I thought it would be a great idea to eat the seeds and guts of the pepper, and immediately burst into a sweat and tears and my lips turned a delightful shade of bright purple.  This is only the third time I have eaten a whole habanero and I have still not learned my lesson.  Luckily, we had lots of beer on hand to sooth my burns, as well as a smoked pork shoulder to feast upon.

The second batch was our second attempt at our infamous Pineapple Pale Ale.  The initial boil was fairly straight forward and only received an ounce of Saaz at 60 min and flame-out.

We pitched a pack of Belle Saison yeast in each batch, and let them ferment for ten days.  Then we racked the beers to secondary fermenters, and added 30oz of mango chunks and another pepper to the Mango Habanero, with a forthcoming dry hop of Galaxy in a week.  The Pineapple Saison got two cored pineapples, as well as a new dose of yeast, this time Brett C, to enhance the pineappley funkiness.

It will probably be a month or more before we taste any of these beauties, so we’ll try to make our Deadpool Double Red IPA and Belgian Saffron ales last until then (highly unlikely).  Hopefully our brewing schedule will become more consistent and we can go back to having a never-ending pipeline of homebrews.

Fun Fact:  Hops are now a part of this complete breakfast!

The “bottom” of a Sweetwater Tacklebox. Not only do they make great beer, but they have a great sense of humor. And a sweet booty.